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remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes that afghanistan is a good country. and has a life of its own. it has a law of its own and has a social context of its own. in that social context afghanistan will move forward in partnership with america and also until partnership with the other countries of nato that have helped us in the past many years. will afg
themes from our new book, "going to tehran: why the united states must come to terms with the islamic republic of iran". the first of these means, and these two get at the heart of our book. the united states is today enhanced and for the past two years a power and relative decline in the middle east. the second core team as the biggest beneficiary of american ongoing decline in the middle east is the islamic republic of iran. if you're not sure you agree with these propositions, i want to ask you to compare the relative position of the united states and the islamic republic of a rant in middle east today with where they were on the eve of 9/11 over 10 years ago. on the eve of 9/11, every single government in the middle east with either pro-american government egypt and turkey in negotiation effectively to become pro-american but government. in libya are anti-iranian like saddam hussein's government in iraq. every single government in the middle east is either pro-americans in negotiations to become pro-american or anti-iranian. it pretty good position for the 90s dates in the middle
provocative thing to say about the relationship between the united states and israel and the senate or the congress than what you said. name one dumb thing we have been goaded in to do because of the pressure of the israeli or jewish lobby. >> i have already stated that i regret the term nlg. >> you said back then it makes us do dumb things. you can't name one senator intimidated. now give me one example of the dumb things we're pressured to do up here. >> we were talking in that interview about the middle east. about positions. about israel. >> now that exchange followed another faceoff earlier today with senator john mccain over the war in iraq. >> will you please answer the question? will you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since until nam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference -- >> are you -- the question is,
is in fact what happens. this was a chronology and when the united states government announced a large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what we should be doing in light of this particular population which was different, in nationality we had not been resettling a great deal. we looked at enhancements which could bring on board that would address this new population and that's when we created the partnership with d.o. de. later >> was this in 2007? >> will yes, later when we identified a new partnership with the counter-terrorism center, that was initially focused on iraqi applicants but we learned by doing and we learned about the heightened level of checks and then we expanded to applicants of all nationalities. we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there were some 25,000 per year for a few years, isn't that right? >> i believe the high point was 18,000 ballots did you have the resources to do some kind of fairly thorough assessment of each of those 18,000 before they were able to be granted -- >> yes, sir,
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the sa; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cardin of maryland. mr. carper ofelaware. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice pre
america and the caribbean forced millions of people to leave their homes to migrate to the united states. we will play an excerpt of a conversation that i had with juan as well as the film's co- director. i want to encourage you to call in as we go to clips of the film in the interview because the faster you call in, the more of the interview we can play. the number to call, at the bottom of your screen drought the show, 866-359-4334. 866-359-4334. if you would like to get a copy of this remarkable film that is opening all over the country in march, call in right now and pledged $100. "harvested in higher" is yours. if you pledge $100, you can also get the book of juan gonzalez, which the film is booked on. at holiday time, just a few weeks ago, the curators of the smithsonian recommended reading his book, which is required reading in classrooms across the country. it is an amazing book, "harvest of the entire." if you want to get both, what an incredible educational resource. the book and dvd are yours for contribution of $150. think about that as he watched recall in. let us know you a
by the united states on mexico. i thought so at the time when i was a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign. grant, of course, during the time of the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. and i just found this a really nothing quote and that's what i took it for my title. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico is somehow wicked. one thing that a toddler in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war which was not about war by any means, from being really enthusiastic and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning against the war. and i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happened in 1847 is a consensus really across the board, people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all this, that a war was
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
the government will treat them as badly as the united states treats them or worse. there are still a few prisoners in guantanamo, the weakest from china, the chinese government. there are some in guantanamo cleared for release. and still held. i don't actually understand why they are still held. they were under the dictator ben all the who has been disposed. one issue needs to be looked at this why specific people are held, and one that many of us have been campaigning on for many years is the last british resident in guantanamo and the united states government has clearly said they want to release him. he is on a list of 65 who need to be released in september but the first time the united states government said the names and identities of 65 of these agencies. we have it printed, the united states government -- we have from the british government the statements over the years they want to be reunited for four british children and those of us who have been studying this thing is is because he knows too much. use a very eloquent man and fight for the rights of prisoners and knows the sto
-- to turn the united states of america into a foreign nations for the purpose of dragnet and electronic surveillance in secret. violating the constitution. i could not stand by and be an eye witness to the subversion of our own constitution when i knew it was never necessary. the best of american ingenuity and -- ingenuity could protect the fourth amendment rights of all americans. >> that was thomas drake speaking with me earlier. sebastian, i want to start with you. the argument is the reason this was re-of the rise is that it will make the united states safer - re-authorized is that it will make the united states safer. >> i am is a prize by the negative reaction. it seems a case of the lady -- i am surprised by the negative reaction. it seems to be a case of the lady doth protest so much. people who are so adamant about civil liberties. it is not george bush in the white house and it is not republicans controlling the senate. we have an extended something that was already put in place. if you look at the cases in the past of successful al qaeda attacks in the united states, the need
by coming to the united states. >> eduardo lopez, you have remarkable footage that has never been seen before in this country throughout. in a moment, we're going to el salvador to talk about what drove a lot of the migration here. where did you get it? >> many, many sources. there's a lot of footage that has never been seen, that hasn't been seen in decades. again, this is a testament to the team that created this. our editor, catherine shields, is amazing. and so is our co-director, peter getzels. i have to say about the dominican republic, i'd like to make a point that one of the main reasons we made this film is to be personified by junot diaz, who is contributing as one of our great american writers. his whole life was changed dramatically by our invasion of the dominican republic in 1965 with 23,000 marines. something that most americans know nothing about because all of this history is never taught in our schools and colleges. so for latinos, whose life is turned upside down by our own government actions and latin america that many times we are unaware of, what happens is there
and grand children. i hope they can go up in the freedom that has uniquely been the united states of america. the united states of america. >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, president obama begins his second term, sunday, the official swearing-in ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. coverage include your phone calls and a look at the 2009 inaugural address and then the public ceremony with the swearing in at noon eastern and other festivities, including the luncheon and the afternoon parade. coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span radio and c- span.org. join the conversation on facebook.com/c-span. >> new features including video feeds from our c-span crew, on demand of the major events, individual -- visual blog page of behind-the-scenes photos. next, highlights from the 2009 inauguration of president obama. and another chance to see chelsea clinton taking part in the national day of service event. in 2009, activities began with president-elect and mrs. obama attending church services across from the white house. they went to the white house and th
in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through talks, will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. that's not for us to decide. it's an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it's the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no particular concern. when we're talking of numbers and how they are calculated. afghan interests. >>. >> translator: the government of afghanistan i would like to ask the question in my own language. mr. president, combative mission united states after 2014, how this mission will be, how will it be resembling, resembling the same mission as it was during 11 years? or is there a difference? different kind of mission. those who are in pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, wha
to measure how effective it has been. measure it by use by the united states. there has been a significant reduction. the u.s. recognized in 2011 there was a 13% reduction. the u.n. confirms that there was a least a 12% reduction. in colombia, there were slight increases. both countries have both doubled the amount. there are other yardsticks that are better and measuring the quality of cocoa production. that is quality of life for farmers. what we found is a dynamic that has just begun to take hold. thomas has to be guarantees -- farmers have to be guaranteed. they can branch out to other things. >> is this sustainable long- term? is it enough to sustain in the long term although there may be short-term reductions. >> the forces would rip out the cocoa crops and people would have nothing to eat and people would credit leave replant. -- quicly replant. the price of coca -- it is these kinds of alternatives that give this a much better chance of being sustainable. it improves the quality of life. >> with me to further discuss bolivia going its own way in controlling its coca leaf production
then do americans in the united states need these weapons? >> they have also killed hundreds of civilians, including women and children. why doesn't he try to find those guns and get them back -- it is his administration who put them out on the street. >> why is it that americans currently -- around 300 million guns in private hands in the united states. why then do americans need some any guns? >> we have a lot people. a lot of people like to have guns for different purposes. a hand gun for self-defense, a rifle for target shooting, a shotgun for skeet shooting. we fought a roll up -- war against britain when they tried to take our firearms against -- from us. we have a long tradition of firearms freedom and individual rights protected by a constitution that many other countries do not have. look finally at whether this bill will pass through congress, in your opinion. >> i do not think the bill to ban any kind of semi-automatic rifle pass at all. these guns malic military in style, but they do not fire the way the military ones do. the only fire one bullet purple of the trigger -- they
status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have been expanded to the more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who had already been settled in the united states. according to press reports this past february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al qaeda is much broader than was previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated la
in as an officer of the united states navy. i will introduce you to the whole family. my daughter, who is a social worker. and my daughter in law on the left. my number three granddaughter, 9 number two granddaughter, nine no. 4 granddaughter -- my number two granddaughters, my no. 4 granddaughter, my oldest granddaughter who is a freshman in college now, naomi. and my third son. i told my daughter when she married, if you change your mind, i'm keeping him. [laughter] i'm very proud of them although i would be happy to claim as my this is a family affair. kids, grandkids, moms, dads. you all get it. you get what it is so important today. we still have 68,000 troops in harm's way in some of the most godforsaken territory in the world. one of the things that you all know -- they are not looking for anything. but knowing that you remember. that we back home remember, we know what is going on. this is an important piece of the equation. another important piece as they started the organization, their families, -- [indiscernible] fighting these two wars. thank god we ended one in iraq and we are ending
and the forthcoming debt ceiling, the united states faces a much deeper challenge. for more than a decade now, for many decades by some measures, america's growth rates have slowed. recoveries have been jobless. and median wages have declined. some combination of the information revolution and globalization has placed tough pressures on high-wage countries like the united states. these new forces of technology and globalization are accelerating and without a strategy to revive growth, long-term growth, all our problems get worse, including and especially our debt. washington's focus so far has been on raising taxes and cutting spending. it should really be on reforming and investing in the american economy. historically when the american government or the world bank or the imf advised countries that got into trouble, they usually stress that achieving fiscal stability, austerity was only a part of the solution. the key to reviving growth is structural reform to make the economy more competitive, as well as crucial investments in human and physical capital to ensure the next generation of grow
and gentlemen, the journey we began together in 2001, that is afghanistan and the united states. it was for a great cause. freeing civilians from terrorism and radicalism, little bitter rating afghanistan -- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's
and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies foreign and domestic; that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i do. >> congratulations, senator. >> please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies foreign and domestic; that you will bear full faith and allegiance to the same; that you take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] to the most important job. that's what i keep telling my grand kids. cowal old are you? >> nice to see you guys. [inaudible conversations] >> do you solemnly swear that he will support and defend the constitution of the unite
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the vice president: the chair lays before the senate one certificate of appointment to fill an unexpired term and the certificates of election of 33 senators elected for six-year terms beginning on january 3, 2013. all certificates, the chair is advised, are in the form suggested by the senate or contain all the essential requirements of the form suggested by the senate. if there be no objection, the reading of the certificates will be waived and they will be printed in full in the record. if the senators to be sworn will now present themselves at the desk of four as their names are called in alphabetical order, the chair will administer the oath of office. the clerk will read the names of the first group. the clerk: miss baldwin of wisconsin. mr. barrasso of wyoming. mr. brown of ohio. ms. cantwell of washington. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will suppor
in the united states with their families while they work to earn green cards. as long as their relatives are u.s. citizens. the middle east tv news giant making a big move here in here e united states, al-jazeera bought current tv from former vice president al gore. all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00, in with the new and out with the old. that is capitol hill hours ago, the historically unpopular 112th congress met a final time making way for the 113th congress. here is vice president biden swearing in members of the united states senate including 13 newcomers. on the other side, the house of representatives floor where new and returning members are sworn in. all eyes squarely on the embattled house speaker john boehner, the republican leader, underfire from members of his party over the troubled fiscal cliff negotiations and, too, his handling of the relief for victims of sandy. the question: would the backlash cost him the leadership job? mike, live on capitol hill. the speaker kept his job but there were defections and a lot of grum
but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man amaino and david chiu and scott wiener as well. they all want to get in on this great celebration because it's wonderful for our city. i have often said our city and our strength is our international status and we do that with all the sister cities, with all of the flag raisings, but this is kind of
kind of iraq did the united states leave behind after all the sacrifice, the american lives lost, the tens of thousands wounded, the billions of dollars expended. what was american policy toward iraq and what does iraq look like today said it is the question that i sought to address by in the up pretty much covered in the entire scope of the war since a lot of reporting on it. >> host: so a year on our december 2011 what have we achieved in a year on had we still achieved then? >> guest: well, why the time, by december of 2011, they're had been a number of elections in iraq, which is to the good, but iraq hadn't fully become a democracy in the sense that it hadn't been a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led by maliki to another pamela starr. i think that is a true test of democracy is whether there isn't an election and russia has elections as i served there there's another candidate wins and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq hasn't set that milestone yet. so, what we had in december of 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but i think un
first term as president of the united states. the president will be meeting with reporters in the east room of the white house, he's getting ready for that, originally he was scheduled for 10:15, now it's been rescheduled to 11:30. about a half hour from now. there you're seeing a live picture of the white house right now on this monday morning, once again, this will be the president's last formal news conference. in his first term as president, he's sworn in in his second term as president. the president will open his news conference later today we're told with a statement on the debt ceiling and why he has said repeatedly over these past few weeks that he will not negotiate with republicans about raising the debt ceiling, as a result he says he won't negotiate, republicans say that is a bargaining chip that they have to try to cut spending to deal with the nation's deficit. we're watching what's going on at the white house, we'll have the full coverage of the news conference leading into it. we're also watching right now what's happening in newtown, connecticut. one month to the stay
states and in court of the united states. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] jon: [patriotic music playing] [inaudible conversations] ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ [inaudible conversations] ladies and gentlemen, please stand as the color guard comprised of members of each of the armed forces presents our national colors. ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, the 39th president of the united states, jimmy carter and mrs. rosslyn carter. [cheering and applause] ♪ [patriotic music playing] [cheering and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ ♪ [drum roll] ♪ [patriotic music playing] ♪ [drum roll] ♪ ladies and gentlemen, the 42nd president of the united states william clinton and hillary clinton. [cheering and applause] ♪ >> hello, hey. how are you? hi. [cheering and applause] ♪ how are you? hey. >> welcome. >> god bless you. [cheering and applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music playing] [c
u.s. banks offline one day, one bank after another. if the united states and israel bomb iran next year to stop the nuclear program i think we can say with high confidence that iran will retaliate. since israel or united states have attacked their homeland iran will attack in our homeland. not with terrorism but with cyber war, knocking out banking prehaps, electricity, causing havoc and getting away with it because we cannot defend successfully today against that kind of attack. [applause] >> that's a sobering thought to start a conversation with. as it happened, there were two pages in this week's "economists" that you should have on this subject on cyber war and i think it is helpful, if you can walk us through what exactly is meant by cyber war. you, yourself, mention cyber crime, cyber espionage there is a blurring of the lines. what do you mean by cyber war? >> you can rebbe using the word chuw. criber crime which is successful -- cyber crime which is successful. the cyber espionage which i think is the most serious thing today, that is the theft not 06 money but information,
, but i was interested in, i think, the real question is what kind of a iraq did the united states leave behind after sacrifice of 145 american lives lost, temperatures of thousands wounded, and hundreds of millions of dollars spent. what was the american policy towards iraq, and what's iraq look like today? that was the question i sought to address, but i covered the entire scope of the war. >> a year op, or, i guess, in december 2011, what had we achieved, and a year on, have we achieved that? >> well, by the time of -- by december 2011, there was a number of elections in iraq which was to the good, but iraq had not fully become a democracy in the sense there was not a peaceful transfer of power from the current regime led to another prime minister. that's a true test of a democracy is whether there's not merely an election, and russia has elections, i serve there, but whether there's an election, another candidate wins, and power is handed over to that candidate. iraq is in the at that milestone yet. what we had in december 2011 was a relatively stable iraq, a lot of hopes, but, i thi
panel would be familiar to what we have heard today. if there were talking about the united states. they would say there is a general consensus that reform is necessary on major issues. there is no general consensus. there is grave doubt as to where the system will be able to overcome to produce in the united states important reforms that will leave this country in a reformed state as opposed to hard battles that will results reforms that are ineffective. that question is paramount. it is paramount in the united states as we look at some of the same issues. having said that, despite the vast differences between mexico and the united states, we really are quite similar. there is the feeling that something new is needed. the does not seem to be a consensus on how to get there. in general terms, i think how each of the government's in l with -- governments dea the reforms will require a great deal of care. i will explain that. i think most of the people in this room understand the relationship between mexico and the united states is generally a healthy relationship. this is not always
, if this is the case, what does this mean for how we should understand the course of emancipation in the united states and the difference between freedom and slavery. so i inauguration the become that slavery is national, that slave -- communities of runway slaves should be understood as what we call marooned. fugitive slave communities, and that the links between people of african-american descent in the norway state -- northern states and slaves in the southern states are important circuits of communication activity they we should pay more attention too. >> host: what are the primary documents you used to research your book? >> guest: i was using a lot of different things. i was using narrative that were written by a slave who so-call ran away to freedom, and one thing that struck me is that although we tend to think about the mason dixon line or the ohio river as the great divide and once you got to the other side you were so-called free, and i tended to focus on the first half of the narrative, the experience of enslavement in the south. when you got to the other side, a very powerful theme was th
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? i do.ndistinct conversations >> congratulations, senator. [indistinct conversations] [laughter] >> okay. [indistinct conversations] >> will you pull that back a little bit? >> you have to pull back so we can see the most important part of this team. please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i
was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, we are going to have a serious, serious problem. my
to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, imperfect union: the eurozone in crisis. (instrumental
of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states seem to recognize the soviets in 1933 under roosevelt. then during the '30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus in trying to stop hitler. the anti-fascist forces globally and the commons party was -- as a result of that. but then during the war, after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide they will support the soviet union because, to bring the service can keep the soviets in the war. the soviets were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the service would think -- capitulates at the moment. the united states offer several things. the soviets make several demands. the united states promises matÉriel and has a hard time living there for a number of reasons. in the first couple of years. stalin said if you give us the airplanes and other equipment that we need, the united states tries to roosevelt makes an effort. other people are not as quite sincere in providing. the soviets second and, they wanted som
accuses the opposition on the spreading uncertainty. >> the united states is controlling all these machinations. they think his hour has arrived. it is an hour of madness with the right on the attack here and internationally. the people will remain resolute. >> he won his fourth mandate and october and is due to take the oath of office january 10th. if he dies or resigns, they call for new elections. >> in syria, opposition activists have began assaults on rebel positions in the suburbs of damascus. >> air strikes are being shown in the neighborhood of natoma. they had bombarded the district with artillery. there's no word yet. they have been followed four months. last august, it was the scene of the worst activist seen so far. >> sectarian protests continue where thousands of muslims have begun rallies to accuse the prime minister of showing solidarity by a attending friday prayers at a major sunni mosque. he is a rival of the prime minister and he appealed for unity among the religious groups. switzerland oldest private bank is closing its doors for good doctor pleading gui
american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look forward to joining hands with you to make it as successful as possible. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> all right. and please consider me one of "us". >> thank you very much. and bona tale. i asked senator leno how do you think they say happy chanukkah in italian? and he said mozel tough and i am glad to be here and i am proud to be an italian american and it's been an important part of my identity. i believe i have the soul in my heart. [applause] . so there you are. and i remember my grandfather saying when he came over on the boat he was told the streets of america were paved with gold and found out there were no streets and he had to do the paving, and i think the strongest part of our culture is "the family". we may have our dysfunctions but our families never dessert us and my family didn't know much with the lgbt issue so when i came out of the closet i thought they would be so upset i would lose them. wouldn't happen. once my son had a sign that said "i love my gay son
of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in the transition process, you have shown a watching world that we are a united people pledged to maintaining a political system which guarantees individual liberty to a greater degree than any oth
president biden. >> ladies and gentlemen, the vice-president of the united states and dr. by and accompanied by supreme court justice sonya sotomayor. [applause] >> and the vice-president has asked we bless this occasion with prayer. so let us pray. the profit micah proclaims you have been told what is good and what the lord require review. only to do justice and love good this and what horribly with your guide. gracious god, at this moment in our history, we ask your blessing on your servant joseph as he renews his sacred pledge to his country. amid all the complexities of our world, a world so beautiful but also broken, give him a share of your wisdom so he can know what is good and give him the courage to do what is always right. what close by him so he can do justice and labor tirelessly for a more just and gentle world. empower him to be a voice without a voice, for those on the margins, those so easily overlooked for you will judge assault by how we care for the least among us. continue to give him the ability to always call upon you in times of need and with the gift of faith given to
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
, here is wolf. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in washington. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world to a special edition of "the situation room." for the next hour i'll take you behind the scenes to my extraordinary trip to egypt. to see if democracy is taking hold or being threatened. i had some very tough questions for egypt's new president. stand by for morning exclusive reporting. >>> i have covered the middle east for decades, but learned a lot during my trip to egypt, i saw firsthand how one of the united states's most important friends in the middle east is struggling after its revolution two years ago. i spent more than an hour talking exclusively with the egyptian president, mohamed morsi. he welcomed me to his presidential palace in cairo. and i toured the city's famous tahrir square, where the arab spring demonstrations changed the course of history. i stood in tahrir square days ago, the symbol of the revolution was largely deserted. it looked very different two years ago, during those intense days leading up to the overthrow of the egyptian presiden
. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal, all are free and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> we're across from the white house where president obama is getting ready to take the oath of office. >>> and here on the national mall, everything is in place for a huge party and all of america is invited. >>> a president who broke barriers and inspired the nation four years ago now begins a second term. a second chance to restore hope and bring change. >> despite all the hardship we've been through, despite all the frustrations of washington. i've never been more hopeful about our future. and i ask you to sustain that hope. >> the pomp, the parade, the inaugural balls will come tomorrow, but this is the day that truly mattered. when the president must raise his hand and swear to protect and defend the constitution. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >>> we're here in the heart of washington, d.c., with spectacular views of the u.s. capitol and the national mall. a two-day inaugural event is getting under way
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